Candace Conti Videos Now Online

A set of eleven YouTube videos (soon on Vimeo, as well) about Candace Conti’s historic court case are now available. Access and view them by clicking on the thumbnails below.

Miss Conti and her attorney, Rick Simons of Furtado Jaspovice & Simons, A Law Corporation appeared before a group of supporters and friends in Walnut Creek, California on July 14, 2012. Two video cameras and an audio recording device were used to make a live record of the event. Those privileged to attend the private gathering all agreed that they had witnessed an amazing presentation.

If you want to learn the truth about one of the most significant legal cases of the 21st century, especially for Jehovah’s Witnesses, watch every one of the videos below and read the court transcripts (available on several websites and soon on this one as well). You will be shocked at the facts revealed.

There will be more on this subject here at Ex-JW.com within the next few days. In the meantime – WATCH AND BE AMAZED!

[myvideogall:Conti]

We encourage comments and questions. If you were (or are) a Jehovah’s Witness child abused by a member of your Kingdom Hall, please feel free to comment below or send a confidential email to help@ex-jw.com.

We want to read your comments and opinions on this most important and timely subject.

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Conti Verdict Explained

There are many questions about the recent jury verdict against the Watchtower Society in California that awarded Ms. Candace Conti $28 million in damages. The following video briefly explains the details in a calm and factual manner.

Thanks to Cedars (JWSurvey.org), “cantleave,” and “nugget,” all current or former Jehovah’s Witnesses, for putting together this excellent presentation.

I can not urge you enough – please share this with all of your friends and family, especially those who are still Jehovah’s Witnesses or have been victims of child abuse.

The Candace Conti Verdict Explained
httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ELBt4mA7sI

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Takeover in Menlo Park – Part One

A small group of Jehovah’s Witnesses, former elders at the Menlo Park (CA) Kingdom Hall, have filed a lawsuit in federal district court charging several ranking representatives of the Watchtower Society with “Conspiracy, Conspiracy to Commit Fraud, Collusion, Fraud, Extortion, Defamation, Mail and Wire Fraud, and Religious Fraud.” [United States District Court For the Northern District of California: CV10-3907 – click here to read the actual complaint as filed in court.]

Jehovah’s Witnesses believe, as all Christians do, that theft of another’s property, and then lying about it, is a sin. In fact, three of the Ten Commandments speak to this issue:

The 8th Commandment: “You shall not steal.”

The 9th Commandment: “You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor.”

The 10th Commandment: “You shall not covet your neighbor’s house…nor anything that is your neighbor’s.”

For the most part, faithful Jehovah’s Witnesses try to live by these standards, even though they teach that Jesus replaced those Ten, and in fact all the Law of Moses, with just two commandments as recorded in Mark 12:30, 31:

Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength. The second is this: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no commandment greater than these.”

It’s clear that true Christians would not consider using theft, misrepresentation, outright lies, or illegal manipulation to take away the property of another brother – or anyone else. It would be considered a “sin” – a clear violation of the commandments of both the Hebrew and Greek Scriptures. Baptized Jehovah’s Witnesses are often punished by being reproved or disfellowshipped for violation of those commandments, and that’s in addition to any secular legal penalties.

We might argue about some of the predictions, teachings, and practices of the Watchtower Society. But most of us, Jehovah’s Witnesses and non-Witnesses alike, would assume that every Christian should strive to follow those clear commandments. Most would agree that a “Christian” stealing from another brother is not really a “Christian” at all, but would be considered “an evil one, demon possessed, or serving Satan.”

Apparently the Watchtower Society’s leaders feel that they are not bound by the same rules that apply to rank and file Jehovah’s Witnesses. There have been many past examples, but the latest and most blatant violation by the Society of the Lord’s Commandments is taking place in Menlo Park, California (USA).

How Kingdom Halls were built and financed in the past

Like most Kingdom Halls built between 1945 and 1970, the Menlo Park Kingdom Hall was financed and managed by local Jehovah’s Witnesses. In order to hold the deed, order utilities, and meet local land use and building codes, a non-profit corporation was formed to hold title to the property. In most cases, little or no financing help was forthcoming from Bethel Headquarters in Brooklyn, NY. Any loans or mortgages were arranged locally, usually through a bank or a private party – often arranged with the original owner of the land or by a wealthy JW who was willing to guarantee the Note.

Trustees of the Kingdom Hall corporations were selected from among the local Kingdom Hall servants, and usually included the Congregation Servant, the Assistant Congregation Servant, and one or two others. If one of the Trustees left the Kingdom Hall for any reason, including death or disciplinary reasons, the Trustees would nominate a replacement. The nominee would be announced to the assembled congregation and a vote was taken to affirm the appointment.

Local contributions and donations paid for the mortgage, utility bills, insurance, and maintenance. The Watchtower Society rarely assisted local congregations financially, except in very extreme situations not fully covered by the Hall’s insurance policies.

Menlo Park’s Kingdom Hall

This was basically the method used to build the Menlo Park Kingdom Hall. The local brothers and sisters OWNED the Hall at 811 Bay Road, just a stone’s throw from the Bayshore Freeway (US 101). There was easy access to the Hall from surrounding communities. It was the “parent” of several other local Kingdom Halls built over the next 50 years. As the local community grew, so did Jehovah’s Witnesses within the region.

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