2012 Memorial Protest Planned in UK

On the evening of April 5, 2012 a protest will be held outside the headquarters of the Watchtower Bible & Tract Society of Britain (IBSA). A protest representative informed the editor of Ex-JW.com that the group plans to protest the Watchtower’s harsh and unloving rules for shunning former members. They also plan to expose the Watchtower’s unfair and unworkable “Two Witness Rule” that protects pedophiles and criminals who are Jehovah’s Witnesses.

Organizers are asking that anyone wanting to speak out against the Watchtower’s unscriptural and illegal teachings to join them. Show up in front of the Society’s UK Headquarters building the evening of the Jehovah’s Witness Memorial Celebration, Thursday, April 5th at 7:00 PM.


IBSA House, The Ridgeway, London NW7 (Stacey Harris) / CC BY-SA 2.0
IBSA House

The Ridgeway

Mill Hill

London, NW7 1RN

The Memorial Celebration will officially begin sometime after sundown and last about 90 minutes. Protest organizers would like volunteers to show up as early as possible. “The public needs to understand that the Watchtower Society is hiding the truth and lying about Jehovah’s Witnesses’ unfair and illegal practices within local Kingdom Halls in the UK and the rest of the world.”

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Expanded JW.org, Mini-Mags Announced

The Christian Congregation of Jehovah’s Witnesses has sent out a letter to all congregations worldwide announcing major changes in how it will distribute the “good news of Jehovah’s Kingdom” starting in June 2012.

Dated April 2, 2012, the letter states that elders will make an official announcement about the contents of the letter after the Watchtower Study during that week. Insiders leaked copies of the letter in several languages, allowing several Jehovah’s Witness discussion forums and websites to publish excerpts and PDF versions of the original letter to their readers on March 24.

The letter describes how the Watchtower Society plans to expand its use of the Internet in the next few months. The organization plans to combine its three official websites under the JW.org banner and then deactivate Watchtower.org and JW-media.org domains. The letter states, “The redesigned jw.org Web site is planned for release around the beginning of June 2012. It will paint an appealing picture of our preaching work, branch offices, Kingdom Halls, and conventions…Selected features from our magazines that can be presented more effectively on the Web site will now be published only on jw.org…In addition, a series of online articles available only on the Web site will present concise, clear answers to questions about the Bible and Jehovah’s Witnesses.”

Emphasizing and expanding its Internet presence is a major change in direction for the Governing Body and the Society. Historically opposed to the Internet since the “world-wide web (WWW)” first appeared in the late 1980s, the Watchtower has  written many articles warning its members against using MySpace.com, Facebook, Twitter, and other social websites. Personal computer use and accessing the Internet has been a frequent subject at assemblies and conventions for several years. Convention speakers have warned Jehovah’s Witnesses about visiting “apostate” websites and forums that might expose the Watchtower’s past errors, false prophecies, and embarrassing leadership. In fact, many local congregations have taken a hard-line against the Internet. Some Jehovah’s Witnesses have been reprimanded or disfellowshipped for discovering facts about the Society on the Internet and then making the mistake of bringing their questions to local elders or writing letters to headquarters. The Governing Body has labeled any online resources that discuss Watchtower history and teachings not owned by the Society as “apostate sites” – even if former Jehovah’s Witnesses do not run them.

Even though current versions are hardly more than pamphlets, the letter states that starting with the January 2013 issues, both the Awake! and public editions of the Watchtower shrink from 32 to 16 pages. The Watchtower places the blame for this change on their difficulty of “acquiring paper and equipment for printing.” One benefit mentioned in the same paragraph is an expanded worldwide readership. “Since each issue will contain less material, it may be possible for more translation teams to be able to translate every issue of the Awake! and the public edition of the Watchtower, thus increasing the number of languages in which they are available.”

The “study edition” of the Watchtower will continue as a 32-page magazine. Because this “private” version is limited for distribution only to active Witnesses and their families, there are rumors that the Our Kingdom Ministry may discontinue as a separate publication in the future and its essential articles included within the “study” Watchtower.

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Dear Watchtower: Why the insults and name-calling?

I THOUGHT I KNEW YOU

An open letter from Barbara Anderson to the
Watch Tower’s Writing Department

In 1517, Martin Luther wrote in a letter to Archbishop Albert of Mainz: “You must graciously forgive that I, that scum of the earth, am so bold as to dare to address a letter to you.”

Yes, I know, you think of me as scum, just like Mainz believed of Luther, wondering how I dare write you a letter, someone Jehovah’s Witnesses disfellowshipped back in 2002. I was accused of being an unrepentant sinner and condemned for “causing divisions,” then labeled “apostate” because I spoke out publicly on NBC’s Dateline TV program about the child sexual abuse policies that protected pedophiles— policies that you helped formulate.  Now do you remember me? I bet you do!

For acting out of conscience, it’s certainly uncalled for to be shunned as an apostate and viewed as dead by family and friends. But according to the July 15, 2011 Watchtower, I’m also “mentally diseased” because it states that all apostates are mentally diseased.

Injuries from a physical attack can heal but experts say insults and name-calling can cause emotional pain that last a lifetime. That’s why there is a saying: “The pen is mightier than the sword.” You know that words can cut like knives, and it appears that’s why you use words in Watch Tower literature that can damage those who differ with the religion of Jehovah’s Witnesses.

It’s been nearly twenty years since I walked your hallowed carpets. I loved every minute of it except for the two times I crossed swords with two of your staff members at different occasions over their unethical and dishonest practices. (One of those staff members is still in your midst.)

Back then I believed in the integrity of your staff writers. I thought they were loyal to God and never underhanded with respect to religious truth. But much investigation proved to me that some Writing Department writers are incompetent and some are just plain dishonest.

If I said the religion of Jehovah’s Witnesses is as bona fide as snake oil, that it is poppycock and bunkum, many in our politically correct society would consider my words offensive and hurtful. Yet Watch Tower staff writers believe they can get away with twisting the scriptures, using them against those who question doctrines and policy, and do it with impunity, such as recently claiming, “Well, apostates are ‘mentally diseased,’ and they seek to infect others with their disloyal teachings (1 Tim. 6:3, 4).”

First of all, that’s ridiculous. Paul didn’t say anything about “apostates”—the Watchtower did. And he didn’t say in verse 4, “he” [any man that teaches other doctrines] is mentally diseased! The words “mental disease” describes a bodily condition. Paul said “he” … “but being mentally diseased over questionings and debates about words.” These men literally “doted,” “craved” questioning and disputes “over” Jesus words to such an extent that the craving for controversy was like a sickness. Since there was no reasoning with such “corrupt” men, Paul urged that Timothy not waste his time with them.

I don’t have an argument with you about your translation of the Greek word noseō as “mentally diseased” or any comparable words used in other translations. My argument is not with the Apostle Paul’s negative description of the mind-set of his primary opposers who were pseudo, or “false brothers,” or “false teachers” questioning and debating a particular matter. However, I do take issue with your interpretive application of his words.

The first followers of the Jew, Jesus Christ, were Jewish and they continued to follow the Law of Moses. (Romans 15:7). Early Hellenized Jewish Christian believers referred to as “Judaizers” obsessively argued over the words of Christ, insisting that Gentile Christians get circumcised and observe the Mosaic Law. Acts 15:5 said some former believers were Pharisees. Paul mentions his struggles with this group in at least five of his letters. Clarke’s Commentary rightly said these Judaizers “… were not apostles, nor apostolic men; but they were undoubtedly members of the Church at Ephesus.”

The issue was between Jewish Christians and Gentile Christians and Paul’s advice was well-timed and specific, certainly not suitable more than 2000 years later. Yes, I know about Romans 15:4 where Paul said that “… all the things that were written aforetime were written for our instruction—.” Contextually, he was pointing to his time, not ours. For Watch Tower writers to take an actual historical event when Jewish Christians taught Gentile Christians a completely “different doctrine” (1 Tim. 1:3)—the observance of the Mosaic Law—and then dedicate a phrase found in 1 Tim. 6:4, one that referred to these men who did not consent to Christ’s words, to former Jehovah’s Witnesses is ludicrous and wrong.

In the July 15, 2011 Simplified Version of the Watchtower, published for children and others who have only very basic reading skills, the author placed a box on page 11, where mentally diseased “apostates” and “false teachers” are defined as “people who rebel against true worship and abandon it.” In this way, you harmfully labeled those who left the religion. Thus, you planted fear in the minds of the readers, most of whom are naïve and innocent and easy prey for charlatans to influence.

Our twelve-year old grandson, Luke, aware that his grandparents left the Witness religion in 2002 and are now shunned, has in his mind the frightening thought that we are mentally diseased. And imagine, if you will, how a child will react to a former Jehovah’s Witness parent after reading that those who leave the religion are mentally diseased. You should be ashamed of saying “apostates are ‘mentally diseased,’ ” hateful words that vilify and denigrate people whom you perceive as sinners because they can’t accept some of the Watch Tower’s teachings and policies that they view as harmful.

May I remind you of what you wrote in the February 15, 2000 Watchtower:

“The ruling ecclesiastical class … violently silenced a voice [Cyril Lucaris – in 1638] that pointed to some of the errors of their non-Biblical beliefs. They proved to be among the worst enemies of religious freedom and truth. Sadly, this is a stance that in various ways survives even to our day. It is a sobering reminder of what happens when clergy-instigated intrigues stand in the way of freedom of thought and expression.”

For over forty years I thought you were different than those in the clergy who sought to suppress God-given “freedom of thought and expression.” But by your words I have come to know that I was wrong!

Yours truly,

Barbara J. Anderson


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Coping with False Prophecy

By Cynthia Hampton

For several years I have been honored to coordinate and moderate a Jehovah’s Witness support group based in Los Angeles and San Jose, California. Our group stays in touch by using the Yahoo!Groups email system and through our ExJWsLosAngeles.org website.

I recently received the following question from a non-member of the group submitted on an automated email form located on the Contact Us page of our website:

“How does one cope with the new information that Armageddon will not come in our lifetime using the information from scripture, ‘This generation will by no means pass away until all these things occur…’? My generation? Or [the generation of] those who saw the beginning of signs that Jesus gave us to watch for that will mark the end of this system? My hope is gone from my heart. I miss my God, but I am no longer sure he is there. How does one cope with that? Thanks for reading.”

Here is my response to this person’s question:

I’m glad you contacted me. I’ve been free of the Watchtower organization for about 30 years. I left when I was 24 years old and have never looked back. I am no longer afraid, because after heavy investigation and research I determined that the Watchtower is a false teacher. In that way, I was able to cope and search for God in a different way outside the clutches of the Watchtower organization. The more I researched and read, the better I felt, and the better I understood that I need not fear any longer.

When I was in the organization we all believed that Armageddon would surely be here in 1975. But 1975 came and went and nothing happened. The same for the rest of the dates the Watchtower had set that proved to be false prophecies. That includes when the Watchtower built a mansion in San Diego [in the 1920s] naming it Beth Sarim (“House of Princes”) for the Old Testament prophets (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, King David, etc.) to live in. According to the Watchtower, those Old Testament saints were to return in 1925. In 1921 Joseph Rutherford gave a speech referring to the “indisputable truth that millions now living will never die!”

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JWSurvey.org announces 2012 Global Survey

There is a new online survey about Jehovah’s Witnesses available for participation by all current and former members at JWSurvey.org.

“Cedars,” the founder and main contributor to the website, announced during a podcast on Saturday, January 28th that the new 2012 Global Survey of Jehovah’s Witnesses is now open for business. The new survey is designed as a more specific and definitive follow-up to the successful 2011 Global Survey that began in September 2011.

Using suggestions from many of the website’s readers and previous survey participants, Cedars decided to expand the 2012 version to include more specific questions directed to subgroups within the Witness culture. There are questions for elders, those claiming membership in the “anointed” class, average active publishers, and even disfellowshipped or disassociated members. Groups also include those who have not been baptized yet and Witnesses who have simply faded away from active membership.

Like the 2011 Survey and the site’s “Mini-Surveys,” participation is free, easy and secure. It also has the added benefit of immediate feedback. After a participant answers each question, the system updates the current totals and shows the results instantly.

The 2011 Global Survey was only online for a little over three months – but had nearly 1200 respondents. “Cedars” and webmaster John Hoyle are hoping that with eleven months left in 2012 they will eventually see hundreds of participants in every one of the six subcategories. “We’re not expecting a lot of ‘anointed’ members or anyone from the Governing Body to take the survey, but we feel that all other categories should be well represented given the amount of time the survey will be online.”

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Menlo Park: From Behind the Scenes

By John Steele


Disclaimer: This article in no way reflects the views of the parties who run this website, are solely my views and opinions, and as such I am merely sharing them with the public. – John Steele


By now many of you know that the court case has been terminated; not dismissed – but terminated. I say this because there is a difference. If the case had been just dismissed then we would have action at an appeal. But by terminating the case and forcing it shut, it basically means that they [the Court] are forcing the case closed and effectively preventing any leave for appeal. In plain language: someone wanted this case shut down and buried.

We were less than 90 days away from trial. As many of you already know, I turned in the “witness list” several weeks ago and stipulated that Don Adams [President of the Watch Tower Bible & Tract Society, Inc.] would be the first Witness I would put on the stand. That coupled with the nearly 300 page opposition to the Summary Judgment, which had a great deal of evidence attached, was enough to terrify the “powers that be” at the Watchtower.

Through this whole affair the Watchtower has only been concerned with one thing – and that is not dealing with the problem, but trying to cover it up.

To this end they have used the usual type of tactics, threats, intimidation – and ultimately money. Yes, they basically paid to have this case forced shut. The Watchtower has made payments to various agencies and parties involved in this, and this is just one of the behind the scenes things that most are not aware of.

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